Travel

Beautiful, more beautiful, mills! | To travel

Free play for the wind

The 140 kilometer long Swedish island Oland is only a few kilometers wide, so the wind always has free play. It is therefore not surprising that the entire island is full of windmills. There were no fewer than 2000 around 1800; every farmer had his own mill. About 300 of these can still be admired today. Most are standard wooden mills, used to grind grain. Oland is one of the sunniest places in Sweden and therefore a popular holiday island.

Iconic

Kinderdijk, The Netherlands.

Kinderdijk, The Netherlands.

The nineteen mills of Kinderdijk are famous all over the world. The image of the five specimens in a row along the water is iconic. The storage mills were built in the 18th century to pump the water from the low-lying polder of Alblasserwaard. The mills have been on the Unesco World Heritage List since 1997 and the area is a protected village view.

Photogenic

Mykonos, Greece.

Mykonos, Greece.

The windmills of Mykonos were built as early as the 16th century by the Venetians who ruled the Greek island at the time. But they were built until the early 20th century. The purpose of the white mills was to grind wheat with which they formed an important form of income for the residents. Nowadays the mills are especially popular with tourists, good for beautiful pictures at sunset.

Extravagant

Moulin Rouge, Paris.

Moulin Rouge, Paris.

It doesn’t have a production function like the other mills on this page, yet this red mill is one of the most famous in the world. The red-painted imitation windmill is on the roof of the cabaret theater Moulin Rouge in the red-light district of Paris where extravagant shows have been given since the 19th century. The theater is best known for the cancan shows with sexy dancers. The red windmill served as a clear landmark and it still is.

Old industrial park

Zaanse Schans, The Netherlands.

Zaanse Schans, The Netherlands.

During the Golden Age, the Zaan region was a true industrial park of windmills. More than a thousand copies together produced paper, dyes, flour, oil, flour and wooden planks and beams. A number of these mills have been preserved to this day and can still be visited at the Zaanse Schans. The recently opened mill museum shows the important role that mills played in the development of our country.

Don Quixote

La Mancha, Spain.

La Mancha, Spain.

On a ridge in the Spanish region Castile-La Mancha there are eleven historic windmills near the town of Consuegra. The mills are known from the world-famous 16th-century novel by Cervantes, in which the old nobleman Don Quixote takes them for giants and starts fighting with them. Not only the mills are worth a visit; the ridge offers a beautiful view over the plains of La Mancha.

Tags

Related Articles

Back to top button
Close
Close