Tech

The experts’ emergency tips: 1. Cybercrime






Online fraud, virus attack or robbery in banking: when such an emergency occurs, you usually need help from experts. We asked four specialists how they should react correctly in an emergency or, better still, prevent them.

The first part is about emergency tips against cyber crime. The German police registered 100,514 cybercrime cases in 2019. That was an increase of 15 percent over the previous year. The numbers for 2020 have not yet been determined. We spoke to Mario Huber, Director of Crime and Head of the Cybercrime Department of the Bavarian State Office of Criminal Investigation, about the subject of Internet crime.

Mario Huber, Director of Crime and Head of the Cybercrime Department of the Bavarian State Office of Criminal Investigation on the subject of Internet crime.

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Mario Huber, Director of Crime and Head of the Cybercrime Department of the Bavarian State Office of Criminal Investigation on the subject of Internet crime.

© Mario Huber

PC WORLD:

What are currently the most common criminal offenses on the Internet?

Huber:

Interestingly, the offenses are mostly distributed similarly over the years. Current issues usually only change the ploy used by criminals to address their victims. In the first place almost always property and forgery offenses, such as phishing for access data or identity theft with subsequent fraudulent use of the stolen identity. But any type of fraud also plays a major role, for example via fake shops. A current problem is the creeping of Corona aid funds. We are currently seeing more forms of investment fraud using cryptocurrencies. There, the victims are promised a high return on their deposit, but when they want their money back, everything is gone.

PC WORLD:

How high is the clearance rate for these offenses?

Huber:

In Bavaria this is around 34 percent in 2020. This is less than the clear-up rate for other crimes, which in Bavaria is a good 60 percent, but it is significantly higher than most people initially believe. 34 percent means that we can solve every third case.

PC WORLD:

All online banks have now significantly improved their TAN procedures. Does that mean the subject of theft in online banking is off the table?

Huber:

In fact, the technical requirements for secure online banking are currently very good, such as two-factor authentication and the push TAN process. Nevertheless, many thefts in online banking are reported to us because the perpetrators have now relocated to the “weak point” of people. This means that the criminals use social engineering tricks to elicit an up-to-date push TAN for online banking from their victims. In such cases, even the best technical means no longer protect.

PC WORLD:

Is CEO fraud still an issue? In other words, the scam in which a fraudster calls or writes to the finance department of a company and pretends to be CEO. He then asks “his” employees to transfer a large amount of money to a foreign company because he has negotiated a deal with them.

Huber:

There really is. Not very often, in Bavaria we usually get around five to ten cases on the table each year, but the damage sums are very high. It is usually about millions that the fraudster was able to steal.

PC WORLD:

The method sounds strange. How do the scammers do it?

Huber:

The attack is usually perfectly prepared. Often this is done by email. The sender’s e-mail signature is correct, the salutation is by name and usually goes to the head of accounting. After all, it has to be someone who can transfer a very large amount. The emails are also linguistically perfect. And finally, the attackers are also trained psychologically. You build a sense of commitment and urgency that convinces the victim. The e-mail exchange often begins with an information such as “I am currently in Hong Kong, where I am preparing a secret company takeover. I rely on your discretion here. If I’m successful, I’ll need an immediate transfer to Company XY in a few days. I rely on you for this. ”It goes on like this for longer. In the end, the victim is convinced that he has to help his CEO and transfers the money.

PC WORLD:

Are you also victims of ransomware?

Huber:

Yes, often. However, almost only companies are still affected. For this, the extortion sums are increasing there. These are then often millions.

The criminal director Huber also has good news for private users: Ransomware is almost exclusively aimed at companies.

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The criminal director Huber also has good news for private users: Ransomware is almost exclusively aimed at companies.

PC WORLD:

Do you have any general advice for our internet users?

Huber:

If you come across cybercrime, please report it to us. We’re thankful for any hint. You can report the case to us even if no or no major damage has occurred. You are welcome to hand in the report personally to the colleagues in each police station, who will then forward it appropriately.

PC WORLD:

What should I pay attention to when securing evidence?

Huber:

The easiest thing is if you take a screenshot. If the attack takes place via email, please make sure to remove it. We need the information from the header of the mail.

More tips against online fraud:

Police warn of Bitcoin fraud – that’s how the scam works

Police warn against classified ads fraud with PayPal

Police warn of dangerous online job offers

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