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Track down Windows errors on: Resource Monitor


Windows offers many practical tools. A very extensive tool is often overlooked – the resource monitor. With its opening windows, the program appears confusing at first glance, but on closer inspection it turns out to be a fine tool for tracking down the causes of errors.

The

Resource monitor

from Windows shows what is currently going on in the background with Windows. It provides overviews of the running processes and services, names the CPU load they generate and gives you an overview of the development of the available disk space and main memory. You can start the program via the Task Manager: Go to the “Performance” tab and click on the “Open Resource Monitor” link below. Another option is to enter

into the search field on the taskbar and click on the hit “Resource Monitor”. Once the tool is open, you can also right-click its button to pin it to the system tray.

After starting, it is best to first click in the “Monitor” menu on “Automatically adjust columns in window” in order to always get the optimal display when the window size changes. Now take a look at the program: In the upper part of the window you can control five registers. The first, called “Overview”, combines the representations of the ongoing processes from the remaining four registers. These registers also have other displays that each run in their own windows. The process window is open in each tab at the start. The other displays can be accessed using the downward pointing arrows on the right. On the right-hand side of the resource monitor you will find a number of diagrams that show context-dependent values ​​for the respective tab topics.

The Windows Resource Monitor looks confusing at first glance with its fold-out windows and the diagrams on the right, but it turns out to be a very helpful tool.

Enlarge

The Windows Resource Monitor looks confusing at first glance with its fold-out windows and the diagrams on the right, but it turns out to be a very helpful tool.

The windows in the individual tabs show lists that you can sort in ascending or descending order by clicking on the column header. In front of the processes there are check boxes that act as filters: If you mark a process on one tab, the monitor also filters all lists on the other tabs for this process. A click with the right mouse button on a process opens a context menu from which you can start a Bing search with “Search online”. In this way you can find more information on most processes on the Internet.

For example, if Windows runs slowly and executes commands with a delay, you can display the processes in the “CPU” tab. On the far right you will find the column “Average CPU utilization”. Click on the column header to sort the list by this criterion and see which processes are causing the high load. Often you can already see which program or service is causing the problem. If not, switch to the “Data carrier” tab and sort the process list there according to “Total (B / s)”. This column shows you the processes that cause them according to the transfer rate. Is the polluter called about

wuauclt.exe

, Windows is downloading new updates and patches. The programs

TrustedInstaller.exe

and

tiworker.exe

however, they are responsible for installing the updates and then cleaning up the system. Behind

MsMpEng.exe

Finally, the Windows Defender is hidden.

After highlighting a process in a tab, it will also be filtered out in the remaining tabs, and you can view the details of this program or service.

Enlarge

After highlighting a process in a tab, it will also be filtered out in the remaining tabs, and you can view the details of this program or service.

The Windows services can also push the computer to its limits. Check the “CPU” tab to see if a file

svchost.exe

causes a particularly high CPU load – each of these files stands for an executed service. Put a tick in front of the file and open the “Services” window. You can find the responsible service under “Description”.

See also:

Windows 10 October update (20H2) ready – innovations and first problems

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