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Windows 11: Activate TPM 2.0 via BIOS update






In order to be able to install Windows 11, Microsoft requires, among other things, that TPM 2.0 be activated on the computer.

The “Trusted Platform Module” is a chip on the motherboard or a component of the Uefi: TPM is supposed to increase security because the system can use it to sign digital certificates, store cryptographic keys and prevent manipulation of the operating system. In addition, this function ensures that a computer can be clearly identified because TPM 2.0 is directly linked to the hardware. It’s built into most motherboards made after 2015. However, this does not mean that the function is automatically switched on. Before using Windows 11, you must first check whether your PC has TPM 2.0 and how you can switch it on.

If the PC does not support the TPM function, Windows will show you this message during the check. It is possible that this problem can be resolved with a BIOS update, or the BIOS has a function that enables you to activate an existing TPM

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If the PC does not support the TPM function, Windows will show you this message during the check. However, it is possible that this problem can be resolved with a BIOS update or the BIOS has a function that enables you to activate an existing TPM

First check whether TPM 2.0 is active on your system. In the next step, open the “Run” console using the Windows-R key combination and type in tpm.msc. Then confirm the entry with the Enter key. The TPM management then starts and should show whether the module is active and whether the TPM is actually present.

If your system lacks the TPM functionality, but the hardware is not older than 2015, the motherboard manufacturer may have supplied the functionality in a BIOS update. So update the BIOS and check again whether the TPM management now shows that the functionality is available but not active. Sometimes the update turns on the TPM. If this is not the case for you, switch to the BIOS. This can be done, for example, by holding down the Shift key while clicking on “Restart” under Windows and then using the troubleshooting and advanced start options to boot into the Uefi firmware settings.

Mainboards from 2015 onwards are generally capable of TPM 2.0. The function can often be retrofitted with a BIOS update.

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Mainboards from 2015 onwards are generally capable of TPM 2.0. The function can often be retrofitted with a BIOS update.

© Asus

Once there, look for a setting for the TPM. Most of the time you will find what you are looking for under the advanced settings, the security options or under miscellaneous – every Uefi manufacturer handles this differently. The designation of the appropriate option is also not uniform: In addition to TPM or the written variant “Trusted Platform Module”, you will often find the designation “PTT”, which stands for “Platform Trust Technology”, on systems with an Intel processor. Activate the function and don’t forget to save the changes. TPM 2.0 is now active and the way for the installation of Windows 11 is paved.

Tip:

Fit for Windows 11: The hardware requirements

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