Tech

Windows Account: Tips for Setup & Administration


Windows knows different types of users and gives them different rights. On the following four pages you can find out which tricks and tricks there are when working as an administrator or standard user.

You need a user account to access Windows. Which files you can open and which settings you are allowed to change depend on the type of this account. This is primarily a safety feature. On the one hand, it is intended to prevent users from inadvertently restricting the functionality of Windows through incorrectly selected settings. On the other hand, this should prevent criminal hackers and malware from accessing confidential data and the system configuration. Because if they penetrate the computer while a user with restricted rights is active there, their access options are also restricted.

Windows 10 knows two types of user accounts: standard users and administrators. Standard users can work with the computer without hindrance, but cannot install or uninstall any programs or drivers, or change any system settings. This is reserved for the administrators. Contrary to popular belief, administrators do not have all the rights in Windows. You are only able to obtain these rights.

There are also work, school and family accounts. These are special accounts for people who also use their own PC in their company or school or for family members and especially children. In both cases, the rights have been adjusted, on the one hand for the use of applications in a company’s network, and on the other hand there are special mechanisms for controlling children’s activities on computers and on the Internet.

Tip:

Create a user without a Microsoft account

Restore administrator account

Windows distinguishes between administrators and standard users. An administrator can assign the respective role to the other users via the Windows

Enlarge

Windows differentiates between administrators and standard users. An administrator can assign the respective role to the other users via the Windows “Settings”.

The user who installs Windows is automatically added to the Administrators group. He can then create additional users via “Settings -› Accounts – ›Family and other users -› Add another person to this PC ”and then also make them administrators – this is not recommended for the reasons mentioned above. He can also delete accounts by clicking on “Remove”.

If you accidentally delete the administrator account in this way, you will only be able to log in as a standard user. It will then be impossible to install files or change system settings, and promote another user will not work either. The solution to the problem is through Safe Mode and enabling Windows’s built-in Administrator:

To restore an accidentally deleted administrator account, restart Windows via

Enlarge

To restore an accidentally deleted administrator account, restart Windows via “Settings -› Accounts “to get access to the required functions.

Go to “Update and Security -› Recovery ”in Windows“ Settings ”and click“ Restart now ”under“ Advanced start ”. On the subsequent screens, click on “Troubleshoot -› Advanced Options – ›Startup Settings -› Restart ”. After the reboot, press the F4 key to enter Safe Mode. There you open the command prompt, type the command

net user administrator /active:yes 

and confirm with Enter. Now start Windows again. On the login screen you can select the “Administrator” account, which by default does not require a password. When setting it up, you’ll need to answer the usual questions. As soon as you are on the Windows desktop, call up the accounts in “Settings” and then create a new user account with administrator rights as described above. You can upgrade another account accordingly by highlighting the username, then clicking on “Change account type”, selecting “Administrator” and confirming with “OK”. Then reboot and finally log in with the new administrator account.

Every program that you start in the context of the built-in administrator account runs immediately with administrator rights. For security reasons, you should therefore deactivate it again after the rescue operation. To do this, type the command in the command prompt

net user administrator /active:no 

and then press Enter. If you still want to use the account, you should at least rename it and protect it with a password. You set the password in the command prompt with the command

Windows now asks you to enter a password, which you confirm with the Enter key. In the next step you have to enter the password a second time.

If you want to save a file in a system folder, Windows displays this message. This also applies if you belong to the group of administrators.

Enlarge

If you want to save a file in a system folder, Windows displays this message. This also applies if you belong to the group of administrators.

Renaming the account, however, is only possible in Windows 10 Pro. To do this, click with the right mouse button on the start button and select “Computer Management”. On the left-hand side under “System”, open the “Local users and groups” and “Users” folders. Then double-click on the entry “Administrator” in the middle, enter the desired name in the following window under “Full Name” and confirm with “OK”. The next time you log into Windows, the new account name will appear there.

Windows security:

Has everything you need

Use User Account Control

Perhaps you have already experienced this: You want to save a file in a system folder or in the root of drive C: but Windows refuses to do so with the message “You do not have the right to save in this path”. Even though you have administrator rights.

Responsible for this is the user account control, or UAC for short. You can find this in the control panel under “User accounts -› Change settings of the user account control ”or by entering uac in the search field on the taskbar. The function ensures that applications only run with restricted rights if an administrator calls them. Microsoft wants to prevent malware with administrator rights from changing the system settings.

In Windows 10 Pro, you can also activate the built-in administrator via the computer management of the operating system and give it a name you define yourself.

Enlarge

In Windows 10 Pro, you can also activate the built-in administrator via the computer management of the operating system and give it a name you define yourself.

For example, if you want to save files in a protected folder, you must also provide the corresponding application with administrator rights. To do this, right-click the icon on the desktop and select “Run as administrator”. In the start menu select “More -› Run as administrator ”. Windows then asks you: “Would you like to allow this app to make changes to your device?” If you belong to the group of administrators, you simply have to confirm the execution with “Yes”. Users with restricted rights, on the other hand, have to type in the username and password of an administrator.

In the default setting, the user account control regulator is only on the second highest level. You gain more security when you push it all the way up. However, this also increases the demand.

Enlarge

In the default setting, the user account control regulator is only on the second highest level. You gain more security when you push it all the way up. However, this also increases the demand.

By default, user account control is on the third highest of four levels. This is a compromise between security and usability – Windows does not ask every time you start a system program whether you want to allow this, but only with most of them. The event display, for example, starts with administrator rights even without being asked. On the other hand, this loophole has already been exploited by criminal hackers who injected an infected MSC file into Windows. If you want to be on the safe side, it is advisable to set the User Account Control slider to the highest level and just tolerate the additional queries.

You can generally start an application with administrator rights via the “properties” of a program file. However, for security reasons this is not recommended.

Enlarge

You can generally start an application with administrator rights via the “properties” of a program file. However, for security reasons this is not recommended.

You can also set individual programs so that they always start with administrator rights. To do this, click on the application with the right mouse button, open the “Properties” and switch to the “Compatibility” tab. Put a tick in front of “Run program as administrator” and confirm with “OK”. However, this is only useful if you regularly edit system settings with the application or want to work in system folders. Otherwise, you should keep your fingers off this setting for security reasons.

Activate hidden guest account

Windows 10 includes a guest account whose credentials you can make available to friends and acquaintances who only need a computer for a short time. However, the account is deactivated by default in Windows 10, and after activation it can only be used in the Pro version. A guest has severely restricted rights, cannot install any applications or other software or change system settings and cannot access other users’ files. It is also not possible to be promoted as an administrator.

The Windows 10 guest account can be activated via the snap-in

Enlarge

The Windows 10 guest account can be activated via the “Local users and groups” snap-in. However, you can only use the account in the Pro version of Windows.

Press Win-R and enter lusrmgr.msc. This opens the “Local Users and Groups” window. Select “User” on the left, double-click on “Guest” in the middle and remove the check mark in front of “Account is deactivated”. Now confirm with “OK”. The account will then be available the next time you log on to Windows.

Explorer with administrator rights

After you have started an application such as the Windows editor with administrator rights, you can select the usual file actions in the save dialog via the context menu.

Enlarge

After you have started an application such as the Windows editor with administrator rights, you can select the usual file actions in the save dialog via the context menu.

Windows Explorer makes an exception when dealing with administrator rights. After a right click on the program icon, a context menu appears that offers execution with extended rights. However, it is not possible to write to the system folder afterwards. The reason for this is that the Explorer is actually already active, because as a shell it provides the basis for file operations on the desktop or in the start menu. If you start the Windows Explorer as an administrator, then you only open another instance of the program with the rights of a standard user.

In order to still carry out the most important file actions with extended rights, you can use the save dialog of another application, for example that of the Windows editor. Call up the program as described with admin rights and click on “File -> Save as”. At the bottom under “File type” select “All files (*. *)”. Now you can execute the commands “Cut”, “Copy”, “Delete” and “Rename” with administrator rights after clicking with the right mouse button on a file or folder.

What is the WDAGUtilityAccount?

A “WDAGUtilityAccount” appears in the list of users in “Local users and groups”. What some users might think of as a virus is actually part of a security function for the Edge browser. Microsoft has built in a so-called sandbox there, which encapsulates the browser in a small virtual machine when visiting a website that may be dangerous or infected with viruses. In this way, the malware cannot jump to the visitor’s computer.

The

Enlarge

The “WDAGUtilityAccount” is used when you visit a potentially dangerous website with Edge. In this case, the browser is encapsulated in a virtual machine and a system user is given a chance.

This feature is called Windows Defender Application Guard, or WDAG for short. The “WDAGUtilityAccount” is the user who is logged into the sandbox. The account is deactivated in normal Windows operation. The account is managed entirely by Windows, you should not change any of the settings.

Show video description

Aldi has again gaming hardware on offer – and real knockers: The Hunter X10 comes with the fastest gaming CPU ever – the i9-10900K and an RTX 2080 Super. The gaming notebook Beast X10 impresses with a 300 Hz display – and the rest of the equipment is not bad either. But are the discount PCs worthwhile or are there better offers elsewhere? You can find out in this video.

► All information about the Hunter X10:
www.NewsABC.net/2508428
► All information about the Beast X10:
www.NewsABC.net/2530948
► Current graphics card & hardware deals:
www.NewsABC.net/2530550
► Acer Predator Triton 500 at Cyberport:
bit.ly/2QNPpJy
► CAPTIVA G25IG 20V1 at Otto:
bit.ly/32RKyfF

Tags

Related Articles

Back to top button
Close
Close